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Home » Lakes of the Atlas » North Saskatchewan Region » Battle River Basin » Miquelon Lake

Miquelon Lake

    1.Introduction
    2.Drainage Basin Characteristics
    3.Lake Basin Characteristics
    4.Water Quality
    5.Biological Characteristics
    6.References
    7.Appendix

1. Introduction

Map Sheets:83H/2, 7
Location:Tp49 R20, 21 W4
Lat/Long:53°21'N 112°55'W

Shallow, salty Miquelon Lake is located within the County of Camrose in central Alberta, about 35 km southeast of the city of Edmonton. It lies on the southern edge of the Cooking Lake Moraine. The lake was once part of a considerably larger lake that receded and left three isolated basins. These are often referred to as "the Miquelon Lakes" (inset, Fig. 1), but this discussion will focus on the largest basin, henceforth called "Miquelon Lake". To get to the lake from Edmonton, take Highway 14 to Highway 21, turn south and drive for 20 km, then turn east onto Secondary Road 623 and drive for 17 km. This road leads to the entrance to Miquelon Lake Provincial Park, which is located on the south and east shores of the lakes.

Miquelon Lake has been used for recreation by local residents since the turn of the twentieth century, especially after a railway line was established between Camrose and Tofield in 1909. The access and facilities at the lake were greatly improved when Miquelon Lake Provincial Park was established in 1958. The park now has 275 campsites, tap water, a sandy swimming beach, a telephone, boat launches, hiking trails and day-use areas (Alta. Hotel. Assoc. 1989). A golf course is nearby. Around the turn of the twentieth century, much of the Miquelon Lakes and much of the surrounding land were designated as the Miquelon Lake Bird Sanctuary. Now some of this land is part of the provincial park, but the remaining Crown land near the lakes and the lakes themselves retain the sanctuary status.

At present, Miquelon Lake is heavily used for recreation, especially on warm, sunny weekends. Game fish are no longer present in the lake, but a pond in the provincial park is stocked annually with a small number of catchable-sized rainbow trout. The beach area at the park is generally clean and attractive for swimming. The saline water tends to inhibit the growth of algae, and the lake is often very clear. Swimming, sailing, wind surfing and water skiing are favourite activities. Boats are restricted to a 12 km/hour maximum speed limit in the park area, and all boats are prohibited in certain waterfowl nesting areas and along the beach (Alta. For. Ld. Wild. 1988).

There has been no surface outflow from Miquelon Lake since the 1920s, and the lake level has declined considerably. In 1927, the outlet creek, which flowed from the most southern of the three Miquelon lakes was deepened to divert water for the town of Camrose water supply. The flow in the diversion ditch ran only about three years, even though the ditch was deepened when flow declined (Hanson 1981). It is not known why the level of the lake has gone down, but climatic factors probably have played a major role (Woodburn 1977).

Physical Information
Area (km2)8.72
Max. Depth (m)6
Mean Depth (m)2.7
Dr. Basin Area (km2)35.4
Dam, WeirNone
Drainage BasinBattle River Basin

Recreational Information
Camp GroundPresent
Boat LaunchPresent
Sport FishNone

Water Quality Information
Trophic StatusMesotrophic
TP x (µg/L)216
CHLORO x (µg/L)5.7
TDS x (mg/L)5402

2.Drainage Basin Characteristics »

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